Hair Transplant Clinic

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The Importance of Hair
Hair Transplant Clinic CustomerThere is little doubt that a full head of well maintained hair gives an attractive appearance, be it male or female. People with poor hair generally find it to their disadvantage and frustration. Almost every hair loss sufferer will tell you that total or even partial hair loss can be psychologically devastating. Remember, "when you look good, you feel good too!". To improve your hair appearance, it is essential to understand the structure of hair and the possible causes of its poor condition or hair loss, in order to appreciate the effectiveness of our clinic's services.



 

The Structure of Hair
Wherever hair grows on the body, its structure and growth pattern are the same. Diagram 1 shows the composition of hair through the visible section called the Shaft with the thread like structure below the skin, i.e. the Follicle. At the Follicle's root, the Papilla produces Matrix cells for hair growth. Accordingly, a declining Papilla will give rise only to downy or Vellus hair as opposed to a strong Papilla, which will produce healthy Terminal hair.





Every Hair Shaft comprises 3 layers i.e. the Medulla, the Cortex and the Cuticle - see Diagram 2. The Medulla forms the core of the Shaft, the Cortex comprises the thickest section of the Shaft on the outside of the Medulla and inside the Cuticle which is the external layer of the hair. The Sebaceous glands which are located along the hair follicles keep the hair lubricated with oil secretions.

The Hair Growth Cycle
Every Hair Shaft comprises 3 layers i.e. the Medulla, the Cortex and the Cuticle - see the diagram above. The Medulla forms the core of the Shaft, the Cortex comprises the thickest section of the Shaft on the outside of the Medulla and inside the Cuticle which is the external layer of the hair.

The Sebaceous glands which are located along the hair follicles keep the hair lubricated with oil secretions. Hair does not grow in a continuous pattern but in the following 3 periodic cycles:


The Growing stage (Anagen) - At any time about 85% of one's hair is in this phase, which lasts 2 - 6 years.

The Transitional stage (Catagen) - In this phase which involves only about 1% of one's hair and lasts 1 - 2 weeks, the hair follicle reduces in size and hair growth ceases.

The Resting stage (Telogen) - This phase involving about 14% of one's hair usually lasts 2 - 3 months after which the hair sheds. Both male and female hair growth cycles commence at childhood until senior age with hair growing at 1/2 - 1 inch per month. Diagram 3 compares the 3 cycles of hair development between the active Terminal Hair Follicle and that of a downy or small Vellus hair, which is affected by the process of Hair Loss or Male Pattern Baldness (M.P.B.).

 
 

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